Tag Archives: Online shopping

Retail A.D.D. – Are distractions costing you busine$$?

Some people think I have A.D.D.

Image by Peter Vidrine via Flickr

OBSESSING about your business – or lack of it?

As a business owner or sales person watching the sales volume graph rise up and fall down, you obsess over potential sales.

BUT … did you lose business because:

Maybe, … but most likely, if truth be told, it’s because you are losing the business you already have.
We can’t see the forest for the trees and we don’t recognize a bird in the hand –  pardon the overuse of overused expressions, but they fit perfectly!
Time and again, we walk into work with honorable intentions to focus on our customers. Instead, we encounter “RETAIL A.D.D.” (horror music in background)

What is Retail Attention Deficit Disorder?

I’ve never heard of it either, but I see it all the time. Hell, I lived it as a retail manager myself! What are the symptoms? Keep reading…
As I mentioned, you walk into your store with honorable intentions, but as you enter:
  • Your eye catches an unruly display and before you know it, you are completely changing it instead of just straightening it…
  • The phone rings before the store is open and a fellow retailer bends your ear until opening…
  • You spot a new delivery and instead of letting designated staff members handle it, you open it and start checking it in…
  • You count in your cash drawer and decide to reorganize the cash wrap desk…
Need I give more examples…? I think not. You know this happens almost daily. And yet you wonder where the day went and how you “didn’t get anything planned done!”

Make a *@%$#  plan!

Before you leave each day, I don’t care how tired you are, write down at least 1 thing you must do to cultivate your existing business when you arrive the next day.
And most important, have you posted daily on the latest store happenings on your Facebook business page and Twitter account and are you sending out a monthly / bimonthly email newsletter? Are you responding to customers who Tweet and post?

Slip Sliding Away…

Don’t let daily housekeeping and distractions keep you from protecting your best asset – existing customers. They are your best marketing tool. If they’re happy, they tell everyone they know how you make them feel noticed as a human. And don’t forget to value your staff. If they aren’t happy, your customers aren’t happy.
Protect your brick and mortar investment through attention to the human factor of your existing customers! Isn’t that what YOU seek from the businesses you patronize?

When I say dirty stores, what comes to mind?

Pigpen

Image by scroy65 via Flickr

Are you low down and dirty?

HAHA, you thought I was blogging about “those kinds” of shops! Nope, today’s post is about customer first impressions and dirt. Real Dirt.

You seriously need to clean your place of business when…

  • Customers keep asking if you have a “fresh” one when they are ready to buy.
  • The dust bunnies on your hardwood floors that the ceiling fans blew into the corners are looking more like snowdrifts.
  • You call it fairy dust when a customer bumps into a light fixture and the bugs and dust fall out.
  • The salespeople have to create ways to tell customers the dirt is a value enhancement to the products: “That’s not grunge, that’s patina!”
  • The sun-faded display items no longer match items in stock.
  • The only time you find lost objects is when a repair person moves something.
  • Your break-room microwave and toaster oven are safety hazards.
  • You buy stronger light bulbs because you can’t understand why the walls have taken on a dingy look.
  • When customers ask to use your bathroom, they are out in record time!
  • (add your own in a comment…)

Appearances ARE everything

While you and your staff take on blinders, your customers still see what you don’t.

And they smell the smells.

And they get grossed out.

What’s the Big Deal?!

Many customers judge your way of doing business by the business environment. Yes, they DO!

And employee morale goes down when the staff gets grossed out – they see it as a lack of respect for them.

You may not see it or smell it, but others do. Hire a part-time housekeeper who does more than vacuum just the main aisle and empty the paper trash baskets. Have them do a deep clean once a month.

List daily superficial maintenance chores as part of the job description - like straightening the cash wrap, not leaving their work station until it’s organized for the next day, taking home leftovers and personal items that accumulate, etc….

Clean out that wealth area!

Maybe even get a book on Feng Shui to really make things cook in de-cluttering and make that money chi flow!

PRODUCTIVITY reigns in a positive environment! Don’t let a little dirt get in the way of better business.

3 Reasons Your Customers May Be Defecting to Online Shopping

Macy's store during 2006 Christimas in San Fra...

Image via Wikipedia

In my experience, most retail sales-floor training is “baptism under fire” with a lot of apologies to both the new employee and ultimately, the customer. And since most hiring is done between customers without proper preparation and investigation before the applicant arrives, this is truly a heartbreak since there are so many super qualified people out there looking for jobs.

Would you pick just any location to place your  business? Would you buy just any equipment for your store? Would you put just any merchandise in it? Then don’t just settle when you are hiring. And invest in good training, too!

Don’t blame e-commerce for your sluggish sales – customers may be switching to online shopping vs. your brick and mortar establishments for these 3 reasons:

  1. Poor hiring and training
  2. Lack of staff loyalty to your company mission
  3. Lack of Customer Connection

Here’s an example:

True story:

I was Christmas Shopping Sunday at Macy’s in Alpharetta, GA (a northern suburb of Metro Atlanta, GA). My growing teenage son needed some jeans, too, so while he was in the fitting room, I noticed some tables marked “Morning Special.” I looked at my cell phone and saw it was about 12:45 pm, so I assumed I had missed it, but since the signs were still up, I asked a passing salesperson when the “Morning Specials” ended. She said she didn’t know and started to walk off.

HUH?! That stopped me cold. Are you kidding me? “I don’t know!!!” ??? Which part about this was the worst…

A. That she didn’t know because of lack of training.

B. That she lacked the loyalty to her employer and therefore was satisfied to tell me that she didn’t know, or…

C. That she didn’t care about me as a customer and didn’t mind leaving me without an answer.

I couldn’t let this go. I quickly said, “You don’t know?!!!” And unbelievably, she said, “No. (pause) I guess I could find out if you want me to.” I said, “Well, yes!”

She came back and said, (and I am not making this up), “Well, it’s either 1pm or 2pm.” HUH, again!!! I was nonplussed. Surprisingly, she seemed to sense I wasn’t thrilled with her answer, and said, “One lady says it’s 1, but I think I saw in the paper that it was 2, so I think it’s 2.”

Am I really having this ridiculous exchange with her? I told her I wanted to know for sure since it was almost 1. She answered again that she believed it was 2. I told her I’d like to know for sure, so she reluctantly left again to ask someone else.

She returned to tell me (yes, you guessed it) … that it was over at 1 pm. I was SOL since it was now 12:59 pm.

Was that salesperson stupid, indifferent, or let’s all say this together…Poorly hired and poorly trained. I have seen a lot of discussions on LinkedIn lately on how important sales training is.  Is this not the perfect example?

So who is really to blame? Yes, the salesperson was negligent and derelict of duty, and she was willing to likely piss me off as a customer who might have trusted her guess that the sale was over at 2, but in the end – it is the employer’s fault.

His/Her poor choice in hiring and lack of good training and follow up allowed the risk that I would be royally upset at the register when told that the “Morning Special” ended an hour ago and I was not getting the discount. Why would I bother to return there to shop after this experience? I might as well shop online…

There are so many potentially bad results from this possible scenario that I don’t have enough room or your potential attention span to discuss. But what is equally concerning to me, is the indifference many employers have regarding employee training. Is it any wonder the staff is not loyal to your sales mission? If you don’t care if they get it right, why should they?

Your sales are based on the response a customer has to your store, your products, and how they are presented.

YOUR SALESPEOPLE ARE YOUR STORE by all accounts and purposes in the eye of the customer. The salesperson answers the phone, is the FIRST point of contact on the sales floor and is responsible for the feeling the customer has as they leave your store – in other words, the behavior and response of the salesperson toward the customer determines the likelihood of whether a customer will come back far more than the merchandise.

So, if the customer has no reason to feel that the shopping experience in your brick and mortar location is any better or more productive than an online shopping experience, why should they come back? Why shouldn’t they buy online if the experience is little different?

Fortunately, the bad taste in my mouth left later when I found a better salesperson who actually gave a damn about me as a customer – a young man who wanted to help me find some jeans with a very cheerful and helpful attitude and knowledge of the merchandise! YAY! Maybe the young lady I had earlier was temporary help for the holidays – but wouldn’t you still want to maximize your sales with properly hired and trained staff regardless of whether they are temporary or permanent?

Spend as much time researching those you employ as you do your products and marketing! And properly train them! (more on training in another post)

In these times, it is an employer’s market when it comes to hiring. Take advantage of it! Unemployment insurance is limited and quality people are spending 1-2 years seeking employment. They may be overqualified, but who better to serve your customer? They may eventually leave for something better, but the influence they have on the rest of the staff and your customers will make it all worth it. You might learn something, too!

Just Give Me a Price!

The Great Piggy Bank Robbery

Image via Wikipedia

How often have you had a potential customer call and ask directly for a price on your products or services? This often puts the receiver at odds or on defense on how to answer. Should you give them the price or ask questions first?

There are several strong reasons for a customer to be so direct in asking for a price rather than discuss your product or services.

1. They know specifically what they want and are simply price shopping for immediate purchase and shipping savings.

2. They are inexperienced and uneducated shoppers and unaware of other options.

3. They are “self-service” shoppers and unaccustomed to and wary of being properly serviced by a seasoned salesperson.

Bottom line? It doesn’t matter which reason they have called for a price. They have been conditioned to do so by the money-savers gurus on the news shows and coupon sites. Give them the price answer honestly, then immediately proceed to ask why they picked that particular item. By giving the price up front, you have helped them let their guard down and they will freely discuss why they have decided on this type of purchase. This opens the door wide on your ability to educate them on similar options and services – especially at your company – and win their faith and trust. If you ask questions first, you appear to be evading the issue and may urge a hang-up based on the resistance and lack of confidence you may have conveyed.

Don’t forget that many of the younger generation have grown up using self-serve shopping and the internet to determine how to buy. They may be unaccustomed to being properly helped to make a purchase. Consider the opportunities for consumers who are very busy (and aren’t they all?) to find someone who can really help speed up the process of shopping? It’s amazing to me that retailers are working harder to speed up the check out experience rather than capitalize on the time/service ratio.

Earn their trust and you will earn their loyalty!